Trumpets Made ONLY by Their Maker



  • I started this thread with the hopes that the input of the owners of such horns may be helpful for those considering such horns to weight the pros and cons that would help individuals to decide whether or not to purchase these horns.

    I can Identify two as an example that fall into this category made in the USA, Monette and Harrelson. If members can identify any more, please add to the list and the discussion. Looking forward to a lot of helpful input.

    First, let me start of with generalizations as to this class of horn:

    Pros:
    Lots of options and input into choosing the horn desired
    AND as a result, the owner will have very responsive horn to the player's personal needs

    Cons:
    They are very expensive
    There will be a long waiting time relative to horns produced by a team of technicians



  • My own personal perspective in finding out about, then ordering my Harrelson Summit:

    I was first introduced to the Harrelson brand by a visiting Harrelson representative that was in my area and arranged for a demonstration with a local professional artist. I attended this meeting, played a variety of Harrelson horns, and came to enjoy the Summit model. That professional came to a rehearsal (and gig) to let me try out the horn I liked. When I contacted Harrelson (the company) to order the horn, I was told I was to get a call back from Jason (the owner) to get specifics about the order. That response really floored me as in all the years I purchased new horns on my own (Kanstul, Getzen, Allora, Olds back in the day) the manufacturer or their representative never called me back to get personal input.

    I almost immediately received a call from Jason Harrelson who interviewed me as to the horns I have played in the past, what I liked or didn't like about the horns. He asked me what I wanted and how I intended to use the horn I was ordering from him. After giving him this valuable information regarding my performance preferences, styles, venues and specific intended use for this horn, he then went over many options as to the leadpipe and bell varieties he offered AND THERE WERE A LOT. This would have otherwise been intimidating, if it were not for the fact that I had already played a variety of his horns AND he was very good at explaining the performance response between the leadpipe and bell designs. He also has a graph with the options and plots out the performance characteristics for those customers that want to see a real time graphic comparison of size vs response characteristics. And that is when I was sold and placed my order.

    So my fist specific question to all other Harrelson purchasers' was this your experience as well?
    For individuals reading this thread that purchased Monette (or other personalized brands), was your experience similar?


  • Moderators

    What do we consider as “only made by their maker”?

    Does that mean the maker fabricates every single part of the horn (including springs, corks, spit keys and all)? If it means that, I don’t think such a horn exists.

    Or does it mean they fabricate all major parts in house? Valves, pipes, bells...in that case the examples will be extremely low still. Almost every horn brand I can think of buys either valves/valve blocks or bells (many times both) to assemble their instruments.

    Or does it mean only one pair of hands assembles/builds the horn (using either bought or self fabricated parts)? If this, there are plenty of examples in the US besides the two you mentioned.



  • @Kujo20 said in Trumpets Made ONLY by Their Maker:

    What do we consider as “only made by their maker”?

    Or does it mean only one pair of hands assembles/builds the horn (using either bought or self fabricated parts)? If this, there are plenty of examples in the US besides the two you mentioned.

    Yes Kujo. This is what I meant in starting the thread, so to that end, please do list the other examples you may know. That would be very helpful in expanding the discussion.


  • Moderators

    Gotcha.

    Mike Del Quadro
    George Schlub
    Mike Corrigan (custom series is in house)
    Brent Peters @ Puje Trumpets
    Ewan Divitt (Canada)
    Josh Landress makes some of his own I think.

    Those are just off the top of my head...I’m sure there are many more boutique makers all over the world that deserve a mention. I’m sure others will chime in.



  • Leigh McKinney still amkes horns as Eclipse Trumpets.

    I played them and was a dealer at one time.

    Very well made trumpets, and his flugelhorns are as good as it gets.



  • Would Jaeger, Flip Oakes, and/or Da Carbo (understanding that this is the product of two guys) qualify? I didn't include LynnZhorn, as I don't think Lynn assembles his horns; he gives input into the design. I also wouldn't include Lawler, since Roy is just doing trombones now.



  • @J-Jericho said in Trumpets Made ONLY by Their Maker:

    Would Jaeger, Flip Oakes, and/or Da Carbo include Lawler, since Roy is just doing trombones now.

    I believe Flip Oakes would be included. I think Ivan contracts to have his horns made by another production staff. However, if he joins us our any one may know differently, they can verify.



  • Terry Warburton that got his start making mouthpieces now makes amazing trumpets, and is the exclusive craftsman that assembles these. One of my favorite trumpet players, Pete Rodriguez has the most amazing sound on his horns:

    As you can also tell from this video, he has an amazing vocal talent as well.

    Back to Warburton, his price ranges are definitely one of the more afordable trumpets within this category.


  • Moderators

    I was under the impression that Flip Oakes designed his horns, but Kanstul did the building... someone correct me if I’m wrong.

    Obviously that may be changing if Kanstul doesn’t come back.



  • @Kujo20 said in Trumpets Made ONLY by Their Maker:

    I was under the impression that Flip Oakes designed his horns, but Kanstul did the building... someone correct me if I’m wrong.

    Obviously that may be changing if Kanstul doesn’t come back.

    Kujo, I believe you are right. On reading his site he states his production is on hold but that he had plenty of inventory in stock and appears there is some arrangements in future production. This is what his website actually states:

    *Many of our friends have been asking what the cessation of new orders at Kanstul Musical Instruments will mean for Flip Oakes Wild Thing Trumpets.

    We want to assure you that it is our plan to continue to provide the highest quality trumpets, cornets and flugelhorns to the community of players who have enjoyed playing the Wild Thing Trumpet and our other instruments over the years.

    We currently have instruments in our inventory, and are exploring all options for a successful transition amid changes in the industry.

    We also have a plan to expand our line with a new series of trumpets — so stay tuned!

    Thanks as always for your support, and please feel free to contact Flip with any questions at flip@flipoakes.com.*


  • Qualified Repair Techs

    @Kujo20 Josh Landress does build his own, and while pricey, they are super nice! As for Puje, my consult with Brent was similar to Dr GO’s consult with Harrelson. The result of my consult and build with Brent is now the Puje 3AM - my initials, in case anyone wondered, not 3 in the morning 😁



  • Andy Taylor in the UK, makes trumpets and amazing flugels.



  • Don't forget Clifford Blackburn and Tony Scodwell.



  • @Vulgano-Brother
    Tony Scdwell makes FANTASTIC trumpets.

    His Harry James "Balanced" model is one of the best I've ever played. Had one for about a week once! Here is a shot of me with a Scodwell Harry James model.!IMG_2098 (800x533).jpg


  • Trusted Seller

    If they don't make the valveblock are they really making the horn?

    More like assemblers.

    Nothing wrong with assemblers! I love the Taylor Trumpet I have in the shop (Getzen valves) and am excited to get a new Puje from my friend Brent soon (also Getzen block).

    YMMV,
    T


  • Moderators

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    Nothing wrong with assemblers! I love the Taylor Trumpet I have in the shop (Getzen valves) and am excited to get a new Puje from my frien soon (also Getzen block).

    I’ve posed the same question to myself and others before. The same is asked for different trades/crafts all over.

    Very few trumpet makers have the resources and tools to manufacture valves and valve blocks. How many companies do?

    Getzen, Kanstul, Bach, Schilke, Adams, Zirnbaur, Meinlschmidt, Monette, and Carol Brass are the big ones that come to my mind right away. Compare that to the amount of trumpet makers out there...the scales tip pretty heavily to one side.

    I still think that the craftsmen we’ve listed above are ultimately considered horn makers though. Especially the ones that design and manufacture the rest of the components.

    “Assemblers” (my opinion) would better describe people that purchase all the parts and then assemble (a Getzen block, a Taylor bell, a Bach leadpipe and tuning slide, and other trim parts/braces/rings to make a horn). There is still a design element there...but no manufacturing, no building etc...

    Those are my two cents.



  • @Dr-GO

    John Davidson



  • Wow! Thanks to all that have been contributing. Here is the list (Currently consists of 14) of what appears to be confirmed Trumpets Made (Assembled) ONLY by Their Maker (in alphabetical order)

    Blackburn
    Davidson
    Del Quadro
    Corrigan
    Divitt
    Eclipse
    Harrelson
    Landress
    Monette
    Puje Trumpets
    Schlub
    Scodwell
    Taylor
    Warburton

    Individuals posting their own personal experience with any of these horns would be especially helpful to understand the uniqueness and quality these innovative craftsman offer in their horns that may give them a competitive edge over the high end production horns made by Conn, Yamaha, Getzen, etc.



  • Personal Experience: Harrelson

    Cons:
    Expensive $$$$
    Heavy, VERY Heavy
    #7 bell Splits Soulo Hat Mute (But it still maintains it's muted sound)

    Pros:
    The most easiest blowing horn I have ever experienced AND highly accurate at slotting with #4 leadpipe; #7 bell
    14b2962a-6a5a-406d-8ec3-8c1bdedef5a4-image.png
    The SWE technology that uses caste bell and tuning slide turns Harrelson manufactures on his own machine tools results in uniform brass thickness at the bends (traditional bends results in a thicker inner turn; thinner outer turn). Maintaining this uniform thickness minimizes energy loss of the projected sound wave as it transfers down the horn.

    With #4 leadpipe; #7 bell has highly controllable sound range that can provide almost a flugelhorn tone with soft attacks, on the darker side with routine play, but can open up with projected accuracy that cuts through ANYTHING when focusing more air through the horn.

    Comes with cool finger button options
    782c4eb2-9abb-4ccf-afb2-0a2a96712ab7-image.png

    AND you can have optional art added to the horn. I chose a tuning slide symbol that puts my two professions together; the bop musician's sixteenth note; serving as the serpent's staff that symbolizes the medical profession:
    fdf4a759-c20c-477e-8f11-2ba9e7d75be5-image.png


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