This is a hoot and is very well done!





  • Yes, one of my people. 🤙 😁 Sarah Hicks has done a number of these. Must've been a movie-themed program. She's a very good musician. Thanks for posting.



  • Fantastic. I loved it. Thanks.



  • Thanks for posting this, BP. A couple grandchildren and I enjoyed it very much!

    Jim



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  • @Tobylou8 I remember seeing that movie when it was new 53 years ago and I was in college. "Blondie" is 89 years old now. The music has no age though.



  • One of my all time favorite soundtracks - the wife and I were just listening to that this weekend.

    I believe Ennio Morricone was a trumpet player himself, and he wrote some great trumpet parts in the score. The trumpet in this piece, "The Trio" is my favorite from that whole soundtrack.

    Trumpet is at 1:44 and 3:50 on the OST.

    And here is the entire glorious scene, which remains one of the all time great pieces of cinema. Trumpet at 4:28 and 6:34.



  • Notice how he has a percussion cap pistol and a belt full of non percussion bullets? It was during the Civil War era. Remember the battle scene? The pistols didn't use cartridges in those days. Oh well... Spaghetti Westerns were not to be taken seriously. Several things in that movie make me gag ....like Tuco taking several pistols apart and making one he likes out of the parts....a pistol sure to have multiple fit issues.



  • @Niner the movie producers didn't want to deal with the mess or the time-consuming reloading of percussion guns, so Uberti (I believe) manufactured a special revolver that looked period accurate, but would shoot modern cartridges. I believe they still manufacture it or similar - an 1851 conversion model called The Man With No Name. Tuco assembling his own piece was a bit disingenuous, but in keeping with his character, and pretty funny. I've always enjoyed that scene, minor historical inaccuracies notwithstanding.

    Having now aired all grievances and assessments of movie props, did you like the trumpet music? I cannot find that particular piece anywhere, but have halfway learned to play it by ear.



  • @neal085 Remington started converting New Model Remingtons used in the Civil war to cartridge guns in 1868. I doubt seriously that using actual percussion guns in a movie would have worked. Probably caused a lot of chain fire without any projectile over the powder.

    Trumpet part is great. I got the record of the movie music. Don't have the written music though.



  • When I saw my first Spaghetti Western, I was so disgusted by the violence that I walked out. Now, I watch it on late-night T.V. and don't even think a thing about it. Sad commentary.



  • @Niner said in This is a hoot and is very well done!:

    @neal085 Remington started converting New Model Remingtons used in the Civil war to cartridge guns in 1868. I doubt seriously that using actual percussion guns in a movie would have worked. Probably caused a lot of chain fire without any projectile over the powder.

    Trumpet part is great. I got the record of the movie music. Don't have the written music though.

    It’s been a while since I have watched any Clint Eastwood westerns, but I seem to remember one where Clint was using a percussion revolver. I believe I remember him having one or more preloaded cylinders that he switched in and out of the frame.



  • I got lo wondering where my old record was. Found it.

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  • And to probably belabor this topic.......here are a couple of my BP pistols. The Remington New Army and the Colt Army. Reproductions of the percussion Civil War models. Tuco used what looked like the Colt Navy ...36 instead of .44. The Colt Navy in the top image by itself.

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  • @Niner I was at the Colt Collector's Show last month, and there was a group that had a very large display of original Colt 1851 revolvers in factory boxes. Super cool. I love the 1851's.

    Most awesome thing I saw all day was....

    I had gone with the specific stated goal of laying my hands on a real, honest-to-goodness Walker Colt, which you're probably aware is insanely rare. There are more fakes than real ones.

    I handled nearly a dozen of them, most of them from a single collection. Real, documented Walker's, although he also had a few known fakes.

    Saw several Dragoon's in different variations. Super cool, but if I ever get one for my personal collection, it would probably be the 1851, partially because they're affordable.

    A cheap Walker Colt in poor condition is about an $80,000 chunk of steel. One recently went at auction for 1.75 million.



  • @Niner And if I went for a Remington, I'd get the 1875. Those look amazing.



  • @neal085 I don't have any original BP handguns but of the several reproductions I have I like the Rogers and Spencer best because it is probably the best design from the Civil War era and a good shooter. Of course the actual Rogers and Spencer was said to have never been an issue weapon during the Civil War.

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  • @Kehaulani said in This is a hoot and is very well done!:

    When I saw my first Spaghetti Western, I was so disgusted by the violence that I walked out. Now, I watch it on late-night T.V. and don't even think a thing about it. Sad commentary.

    I loved the soundtrack to A Clockwork Orange and when the movie was to be showing at my University I didn't hesitate to budget $1.00 more to bring a date.

    First date. Last date. Actually, pretty much the last time we ever talked.



  • @Vulgano-Brother

    I guess she didn't like the soundtrack to Clockwork Orange...☺



  • @GeorgeB said in This is a hoot and is very well done!:

    @Vulgano-Brother

    I guess she didn't like the soundtrack to Clockwork Orange...☺

    My bet is that she was unimpressed by only going on a dollar date. VB didn't even take her to Dollar General for a snack for crapping out loud!


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